Jurassic coast retreat

The Jurassic coastline of Dorset was yesterday reaching the national headlines this time, it was not due to a rare find of ancient fossils but due to a substantial landslide and rockfall. Incredible images of the extent of the landslip and rockfall can be seen in this BBC news piece1. Two sections of the cliffs...

Going the extra mile to keep everyone healthy

This last year has been the most unusual and eventful year for us all, to say the least. For most, lockdown had an impact on our personal and professional lives, our lifestyle as well as our physical and/or mental health. At Groundsure and Mining Searches UK, we wanted to make sure that even though we...

Are you really as risk compliant as you think you are?

In September 2020, Groundsure launched GeoRisk, a new suite of mining and ground stability search reports . We took inspiration from recent collapse events, in depth customer research and most importantly, guidance from the Law Society in the name of the Conveyancing Handbook. I would forgive anyone who hasn’t perhaps read this cover to cover,...

Covehithe – The village lost to sea

Covehithe is a small village in East Suffolk, located on the North Sea coast between the more well known towns of Lowestoft and Southwold. I had never heard of Covehithe until today when I was sent a YouTube video showing the damaging effects coastal erosion is having on this quaint village. Everyone says a picture...

Ground stability hazards around Greater London

London is a particular hotspot for subsidence. A large number of properties in the Greater London area are built on London Clay, which is one of the most shrinkable of soil types as it’s highly susceptible to changes in volume caused by variation in water content1. This is reflected in the deformation of ground by...

The hidden dangers of old mine workings

It was reported1 earlier today, that an unfortunate incident occurred with a farmer sadly being injured after falling into a sinkhole. The description of such hole is reported by the BBC as “a narrow throat, and then there was a large bulbous bottom”. Our mining experts instantly knew this related to an iron ore bell...